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Authentic CDV Photo of President Abraham Lincoln with his son Tad, ca. 1870, measuring 3.875"x2.5". Written on the face on the Lincoln photo in pencil: "A Lincoln and Son"
Overall in very nice original condition. These have been getting harder to find in recent years.
PRICE: $250
Rare Indian Wars/Spanish American War Era 1st US Cavalry Officer's Kepi, ca. 1890's. This style of kepi was not in service, nor in favor for a very long period of time and as a result they have become quite scarce today. This is a great example of a Cavalry officer's kepi manufactured by the famous Henderson-Ames Company of Kalamazoo, Michigan. Overall the cloth is in very good condition, except for a tear on either side of the insignia. The brim is intact with moderate scuffing, and the gold band, chin strap, and buttons are in great shape. The liner is intact and clearly marked, while the sweatband has come partially unstitched. A great looking piece of late 19th century militaria that displays quite nicely. These do not turn up often!
PRICE: SOLD
Scarce "Osborne" Marked British Brown Bess Musket Bayonet, ca. 1790-1820. A fantastic example with great patina and clear markings. The socket measures 4" long, while the entire bayonet measures 21 1/2" total. Large triangulated blade measures 1 1/4" across the widest flat, and is marked "OSBORN" in large script, with "31" under a crown. These early Brown Bess bayonets are becoming harder to find. 
Fantastic Codding Bros. & Heilborn Sterling Silver Miniature "Channing Club Pistol Contest" Shooting Prize Trophy Cup, ca. 1890, made of solid Sterling Silver by C.B.& H. of North Attleboro, Massachusetts. This little trophy only measures 1 3/4" tall to the brim, and 2 1/4" tall to the top of the handles. The bowl is 1 1/2" in diameter. It is engraved on the face; "CHANNING CLUB / PISTOL CONTEST", and marked "C.B.&H." at the base. A wonderful addition to any vintage shooting collection, as this is certainly the smallest trophy we have seen!
PRICE: SOLD
RARE MUSEUM PIECE Original "John Brown" Pike - Civil War made by Charles Blair #456, This pike is one of approx. 950 that were made by blacksmith Charles Blair of Collinsville, Connecticut, by order of abolitionist John Brown. The pikes were made in two batches between 1857-1859, and were all serial numbered. The pikes, along with several other pistols and rifles, were ultimately sent to the Kennedy Farm farm in Maryland, not far from the US arsenal at Harper's Ferry, where they were stored for John Brown. On October 16th 1859, John Brown led his attack on Harper's Ferry along with 21 other men, all of which were armed with these pikes, Sharps rifles (also ordered by Brown), and other various weapons. His plan was to overwhelm the arsenal, and supply a raised "army" of slaves with the weapons inside. These pikes were intended to arm Brown's slave army, once the rebellion was triggered by this raid. US Marines under the command of Colonel Robert E. Lee arrived at the arsenal however, and forced the attack to subside. Four persons were killed in the attack, and ten of Brown's raiders were killed. John Brown was captured and would be hanged in December of 1859 for his role in leading the attack.
This pike is numbered "456", with a forged double edged blade that measures 9 3/4" long. The guard is 4 1/4" wide, with a 3 1/8" long tapered ferrule. It is pinned through the handle just as it should be. It is fixed to a Ash handle that measures just over 57 1/2" long. There is what appears to be hemp line wrapped around the furthest end of the handle, and a old hole drilled through the very end.
Very few of these pikes have survived, and the known examples are almost all housed in museums. One was the focuss of a recent episode of the TV show "History Detectives". This is a very important piece that was used in one of America's most important moments, and is a truly special piece. To the best of our knowledge, there are currently no other examples on the market. This pike was found in a house in Guilford, Connecticut, and has never been offered to the public.
PRICE: SOLD
Original Civil War US Cap Box, nice example, complete and intact with the exception of the hair or fur it would have had on the inside to help keep the caps contained. The leather is dry, cracked, and stiff. No visible markings. Great look and perfect for any Civil War display.
Very Rare A. W. Spies Gold Gilt/Blued Eagle Head pommel 1820's U.S. Militia Officer's Sword, A. W. Spies was a precursor in sense to Tiffany & Co. in quality and style, but their items are encountered even less frequently than those of Tiffany. This sword is currently in more of a relic state, but is untouched and could be restored if desired. The blade measures 28" long, and has some traces of the original bright blue finish still showing, as well as the gold gilded engraving. It is marked "A.W.SPIES" in a engraved banner, and the tang is marked with what looks to be " X SON". The grip, which woul dhave either been bone or Ivory, is missing, and the guard is bent. Nice original eagle head pommel, and good traces of gold gilt overall. The original scabbard shows nice engraving, and has traces of gilt in protected areas. Original hand made chain is excellent. A very cool, early U.S. officer's sword that would be very costly to acquire in better condition.
PRICE: SOLD
RARE N. Starr & Co. M1798 US Light Cavalry Saber, One of only 2,000 ever made, and one of approx. 40 known to exist. This was the very first US Government contract sword made after the Revolutionary War, and is considered to be a highly sought after and important saber. This sword recently came out of a private collection assembled between the 1920's and 1960's here in Connecticut and has never been offered for sale to the public before. The leather wrap and brass wire are missing from the handle, yet the original wood is still intact and shows great wear. The left side of the blade still very faintly bares it's original "US 1799" marking, while the maker's name "N. Starr & Co." appears to be worn away completely from the right side. There is an old insurance/museum number painted on the right side as well. Overall the metal has a dark brown patina with old scattered surface pitting throughout, very attractive look though. The blade is intact and full, never cut down or broken. About 2/3 up the blade there are several nicks in the edge of the blade from striking other swords in battle. The very tip of the blade has just a slight bend to it, hardly worth noting and easily fixable if desired. This is a truly rare sword, and certainly a piece that does not come up for sale often.
PRICE: SOLD
PRICE: SOLD
PRICE: SOLD
Unique and Important "John Pease" Patent 1865 Civil War US Cartridge Box Prototype with Patent Tags, This cartridge box was first designed by John Pease of Boston, Massachusetts, and patented in 1864, during the Civil War. The original patent tag, dated June 25th 1864, is included (the orange tag). He revised his box, and patented his final version on October 31st, 1865, US Patent No. 50,730. This cartridge box is his actual prototype box, and included is his final, official patent tag from 1865. A search online will reveal a description and drawings of this box still in the US patent office.
The box itself is in very good condition, with minimal wear overall. The original tins are inside, and the unique side flaps are intact. The strap to secure the main flap is ripped and missing the very tip, and the inside flap has come unstiched. The top of one belt loop has also come unstiched. These could all be repaired if desired, the box is in otherwise very good shape. As far as we know, this cartridge box never went into production, making this box potentially a one of a kind piece. This is a important box that you won't see in any other collection.
PRICE: SOLD
RARE Confederate Cavalry Saddle Bags, ca. 1860's. This pattern has been observed as being of the Civil War era, and probably of Confederate useage. The bags are a rich, dark brown color, and appear to be unmarked. The boxes with flaps measure roughly 15"x10 1/2", and have half moon designs tooled on them, with tooled boarders. Two straps are missing from one bag, and there are some old tears coming off the edges of the leather that goes up over the horse. Considering their age and rarity, they are in very fine condition. A very unusual and impressive set of saddle bags!
PRICE: SOLD
Rare Silver Mounted 18th Century Gentleman's Hunting Sword, ca. 1750-1780. This sword features a 22 3/8" blade, that has a single blood groove near the top of the blade, with the last 6 1/4" being double edged. The hilt and furniture are all carved solid silver, featuring a lion's head on each side near the fuller, and a clamshell motif on each side of the guard. There is a wonderful looking man's face on the pommel, along with two more clamshell motifs. The silver has great patina, with blackening in protected areas. The point where the gaurd joins the pommel has come slightly undone, and looks to have been soldered once before. The handle is perfectly carved Ebony. There is an age crack on the right side of the handle, and a much smaller one to the left side. The sword measures 27 1/2" overall, with the blade's tang having been nicely pinned over at the pommel. The blade is full, but has scattered nicks along 3/4 of it's edge. This is a very rare find and a beautiful piece to display. 
PRICE: SOLD
Original Regimentally Marked Civil War Backpack, ca. 1864, great original piece that has been in our collection for years. All original, tarred canvas over wood, with "20 SEP. CO." painted over an old 51st Regt. markings. There are some tears here and there, but overall everything is there and it's complete. There are some belt/strap pieces and buckles loose inside. These have been getting tougher to find. A great looking artifact of the Civil War.
PRICE: SOLD
RARE American 18K Gold Schuetzen Long Range Rifle Medal with Original Case, dated 1913. This is a truly stunning piece, made by famed New York jewelers Berenbroick & Martin. The medal is solid 18K gold, and meadures 3 1/4" long, by 2" at it's widest point. The case is in wonderful condition and clearly marked on the inside. A rare opportunity to own a top quality vintage American shooting medal.
RARE American ID'd 18K Gold Schuetzen Rifle Medal from The Electric City Rifle Club, 1908. A spectacular medal from one of the early Schuetzen clubs of America, the Electric City Rifle Club of Scranton, PA. This medal has been tested to be solid 18K Gold, and measures 2 3/8" from top to bottom, and 1 3/8" accross at it's widest point. It is fully engraved with a sculpted Eagle in the middle, and blue & white enamel in the center. The reverse is inscribed to the winner, Arnold Kehrli, 1908, who can be seen seated second on the right, next to his brother Andrew, in the club photo shown. A rare medal of stunning quality, ID'd to an American shootist!
PRICE: SOLD
RARE Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg 1814/1815 Battle of Waterloo Bronze Medal. These medals were presented to members of the Foreign Legion for their participation in the Battle of Waterloo and campaigns of 1814 & 1815. Only 223 were made. Bronze with Gold gilt measuring 1 5/8" in diameter. Stamped inscription around the boarder reads: “HERZOGTH GOTHA VND ALTENBVRG MDCCCXIV-MDCCCXV”. This medal comes straight out of a WWII veteran's collection and was taken home from Europe during his service. Offered here to the market for the first time ever.
Rare 1908 Yale Brewing Co. Schuetzen Bund Rifle Match Shooting Prize Silver Trophy Cup, measuring 7 1/2" tall to the brim and just over 8" to to the top of the handles. The bowl measures 4 3/4" in diameter. An engraved inscription on the face reads; Thirty Ninth Annual Prize Shoot / S.N.E. / Schuetzen Bund / Presented By / Yale Brewing Co. / 1908". The trophy is Silver plated, and marked on the bottom 1699 Guaranteed, manufactured by the Poole Silver Co. in Taunton, Massachusetts. Overall a fantastic looking early American shooting prize!
PRICE: SOLD
RARE Revolutionary War era Colonial Cup Ball & Chain Prisoner Leg Irons, ca. 1750-1780. Absolutely 100% authentic, dug right here in Connecticut. Forged iron links, with a forged ring on one end. The solid iron ball, weighing 9 lbs, is held between two iron "cups", fixed to a chain on either end. The ball itself measures 4" across, while the entire set extended from tip to tip measures 65". Each link shows extensive wear at the ends from usage, and the metal is rusty from exposure to the elements. There is some deterioration to one cup. Real leg irons are very hard to find, and these being so early make them a highly unusual artifact.
PRICE: SOLD
PRICE: SOLD
RARE 1884 National Rifle Association "Schuetzen" Long Range Rifle Silver Medal, made of solid Silver and finely detailed. The medal measures 2 1/4" from top to bottom, and 1 1/2" wide. The craftsmanship and patina is excellent. It's very rare to find a real NRA Silver medal this early.
PRICE: SOLD
Important Civil War Document - General Orders 178 from Washington to Major George L. Stearns appointing him as Recruiting Commissioner of U.S. Colored Troops, June 17th, 1863. George L. Stearns was a prominent abolitionist before the war, and helped recruit the very first state sponsored black regiments of the Union including the 54th Massachusetts. This order was issued only one month prior to the 54th's infamous attack on Fort Wagner, and is issued by the Secretary of War to George Stearns, appointing him recruiting commissioner of the new United States Colored Troops. Stearns would go on to recruit thousands of African Americans into service throughout the remainder of the Civil War, and this is the actual order that started it all. It is also signed in ink by United States Assistant Adjutant General Thomas H. Bradley, and notes General Orders 143, 144, and 252. The document is in very good condition overall, with nice color and no rips, tears, or stains. The actual document measures approx. 4 1/2"x7" and is framed. A very intriguing and historical piece of Civil War history!
PRICE: SOLD
Fantastic American 18K Gold 1899 ECRC Schuetzen First Prize Off Hand 200 Yard Rifle Medal, A spectacular medal from one of the early Schuetzen clubs of America, the Electric City Rifle Club of Scranton, PA. This medal has been tested to be solid 18K Gold, and measures 3" from top to bottom, and 1 5/8" accross at it's widest point. It is fully engraved with a sculpted star design, and blue enamel in the center. The quality of this medal is just amazing. A truly impressive American gold medal from the turn of the century!
PRICE: SOLD
RARE Colonial 8 Inch Siege Coehorn Mortar with Carriage, ca. 1725-1780. This mortar was recently sourced out of upstate New York, and probably saw use in one of the early fortifications in that area (Fort Ticonderoga, Fort William Henry, Fort Frederick etc..) It is most likely of English origin, and the gun itself measures 25 1/4" long and 12" 'round, with an 8-inch bore. It is made of iron and weighs between 500-600lbs. The trunyan caps are original to the mortar. The touch hole appears to have been spiked long ago, and a new one re-drilled at a later date. The top, mid section of the tube shows signs of once having an embossing, most likely the british crown/"GR" motif, that has been removed long ago. This, along with the spiking, tell us that the gun was most likely captured by American or French forces (during either the French & Indian or Revolutionary War). The British would have spiked the gun before loosing it to prevent it's re-use against their own forces, and the new owners would have naturally removed any signs of their British opponent. The gun is mounted on a finely executed contemporary wooden carriage, constructed with authentic pegged 18th century beams and hand forged iron furniture. The carriage is mounted on casters to easily roll the gun. Early siege mortars like this are very scarce, and seldom appear on the market. This would be the focal point of any collection or den.
PRICE: SALE PENDING
PRICE: SOLD
Rare and Unusual Texas Revolution American Militia Artillery Fuse Box, ca. 1832-1834. A very unusual piece that perhaps saw use at The Battle of San Jacinto, or even the Alamo. The style of crossed cannon insignia is patterned directly after a popular militia design that came into use in the early-mid 1830's. This design is pictured in The Book of American Military Insignia 1800-1851 by J. Duncan Campbell, Figure 160. It's rather crude casting would help support that this was made for militia unit, and not manufactured by a regular army contract. Below the cannons is a brass button pin with a 5 point star, the promient symbol of Texas. The button and star are part of the insignia to represent a Texas Artillery militia unit. The cannon inside the Alamo was commanded by Captain Carey's Artillery Company, aka "The Invincibles". This box would have been in use right at this time, in Texas. It is possible that this box could have been at the Alamo, or certainly in Sam Houston's army that was assembled after the battle. The insignia is flanked by two brass 8 point stars, and boardered by a heavy brass plate. The box itself measures 6 1/4" long by 3" tall, and 1 3/8" deep (approx. 1 3/4" with the flap closed). It is constructed of wood covered in leather, with brass capped nailed to the ends. Interestingly there are five notches carved into the top of the box. The original strap that attached to the rear of the box to fasten it closed is missing. The leather shoulder strap has a few small tears but is intact overall. Someone added a thin leather strip to the back of the strap long ago to help keep it stable. The buckle appears to be Nickel Silver, and is a 3" x 2 1/2" oval. The tip of the belt has a wonderful Nickel Silver "whale tail" motif cap. The strap is buttoned on either side with a small Nickel Silver button with a two-line turned design, and the strap is fixed to the box via two cast brass swivels. Militaria from the Texas Revolution is very rare, and this piece was surely used by a defender of Texas.
PRICE: SOLD
Rare Civil War Confederate Cavalry or Officer's Flap Holster for Navy Style Revolver, ca. 1861-1865. This is a fantastic example of what a typical Confederate holster would have looked like. The holster measures roughly 15" overall and shows the clear imprint of an
octagon barrelled Navy revolver. This would have either been a captured M1851 Colt, or Confederate manufactured Augusta, Colombus, or Schneider & Glassick Revolver. The holster is hand riveted with copper or brass rivets, and hand stitched. The straps to hold the flap closed are missing. There is a very small hole near the muzzle, and an old well done repair around the triggerguard area. Overall a really interesting and great looking Confederate made holster that will make a perfect display alongside your Confederate revolver!
PRICE: $1,250
PRICE: SOLD
Civil War Era Military Style Flap Holster for Colt Pocket Revolver, Possibly Confederate, ca. 1860's. This is a neat little holster that very well may be of Confederate origin. It accommodates either a M1849 or M1862 Colt Pocket revolver with approximately a 3 1/2"- 4" barrel. The leather is somewhat dry on the surface but still supple and intact. The rear edge is not only stitched but rivited with brass rivets which is frequently seen on southern made holsters. The stud that holds the flap closed is missing, original belt loop is intact. A good looking Civil War era holster for the money!
Wonderful Pre-Revolutionary War Scrimshaw Powder Horn of Dumah Kirke, Crown Point, New York, 1770. This is a great looking horn that most likely was used in the Revolution. There is a ton of detail within the scrimshaw and certainly much research still to be done regarding the history of the horn and it's owners. The entire horn measures 20" along the outer curve, and 15" long across from tip to tip. The main inscription reads "DUMAH KIRKE / hif horne made at Crown Pointe / Sebtembre 16 1770". Other depictions include a three masted Man of War ship, nautical star, two interesting caricature type figures, floral scrolls and border patterns. There are several names written around one of the figures which appear to read "LINDAL CLAYFORDE / BREWER / FINLY / HOUSTN / NIAGRA / NIAGRA / ALBANY / JAMES GADELL". Lastly there is an image of a rising sun or star motif enclosed by a decorative structure. On the structure is a banner which reads in Latin "VIVAT REX", or "Long live the King". This is flanked by a colonial soldier and Lion on either side. The horn has a fantastic color and patina. The wood plugged bottom is secured by small copper nails with a large iron Rosehead nail at it's center to tie a shoulder strap to. There are several small holes through the lower outward facing section of the horn with one facing toward the inside. These appear to be naturally caused by age and use. There is some old damage along the side of the horn through the "Dumah Kirke" name that appears to have been repaired with glue years ago. Carved horns of this age with such great subject matter have become very scarce recently, and as previously stated further research could yield some very interesting historical information about where this horn has been.
PRICE: SALE PENDING
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JEREMIAH JOHNSON TRADING
1618 Saybrook Rd. Haddam, CT.
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