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Wonderful Identified French or Belgium Made Half Stock Flintlock Fowler, Converted to Percussion, 18 Ga, mfg. ca 1810. This gun has a fantastic look! It is unmarked but is probably either French or Belgium made and used here in America. The barrel Damascus measures 33" long and originally featured a long blade front sight which is now missing. The metal has a dark plum patina overall. The stock features a large cheekpiece and checkered wrist. The wood has a heavily worn and untouched look with the name "J. R. SHORT" stamped vertically near the buttplate. I would assume this was the original owner of the gun. There is a 1 1/2" sliver of wood missing just forward of the lock with a 1/2" crack behind and forward of the rear lock screw. Additionally there is a large old crack through the forestock which is visible on both sides. Brass buttplate, triggerguard, lock screw escutcheons, and ramrod pipes all feature heavy patina with a mellow, blackened color. Sling button is secured to the buttstock with a sling eye on the rear ramrod pipe. The wood ramrod is original from the period. The barrel wedge is missing and the tip of the hammer screw is either broken or missing. The action functions tight, and the original nipple is slightly damaged. Overall a great looking old fowler that is perfect to hang up over your fireplace!
Scarce W. G. Rawbone, Toronto, Canada, High Grade Percussion Double Barrel Shotgun, 10 Ga, mfg. ca, 1870. William G. Rawbone successfully operated a gunsmithing and retailing firm in South Africa throughout the 1860's before moving to Canada around 1870. There he continued to repair and sell guns out of his Toronto based shop. Rawbone also held several patents for firearm related tools which he had developed. This is a wonderful example of a fine English shotgun which was imported and retailed by Rawbone while in Canada. It features 32 1/2" Damascus barrels which are marked "FINE LAMINATED STEEL" and English proofed. The barrels are proofed as "12 bore", or "11 Gauge" by American standards, though they actually measure closer to 10 Gauge. The ribs are solid and the metal has an even dark patina throughout. Fine engraving can be seen on the locks, sculpted hammers, breech and barrel tang, triggerguard, and forend cap. Both locks are marked "W. G. RAWBONE / TORONTO". The stock is nicely figured and features a checkered wrist and forearm. The wood has a fantastic original patina and features a Silver shield nameplate above the toe of the buttstock. There is an nicely repaired old 5" crack on the left side of the forearm with a few small old chips missing from the upper edge along the right side. Otherwise the wood is sound with no other cracks, chips, or repairs. Original ramrod pipes and metal tipped wood ramrod and brass bead front sight. Both hammers are matching originals and both actions are crisp and function perfectly. Both nipples are clean originals. This is a well above average quality gun in great original condition with a very rare name!
PRICE: $750
French & Indian War 1st Model Tower 1741 Brown Bess Musket
Sold by JJT
PRICE: SOLD
Belgium Made African Trade Flintlock Musket, .60 cal smoothbore, mfg. ca. 1875-1900. This gun started life as surplus M1854 Austrian Lorenz musket parts which were built into the flintlock musket you see by a Belgian armory in the late 1800's. These guns were made to supply weapons to certain colonies in Africa which at the time were not allowed breech loading firearms. Many were later sold as surplus to the US through sources such as Bannerman's military catalog. The musket features a "BELGIUM" marked and proofed barrel which measures just over 37" long. It features a military style post front sight with traces of a filled rear sight dovetail. The lock is Austrian proofed and bares the number "859" (likely a date code for 1859). The metal retains 90%+ of an old re-blue finish. The stock is in very good condition overall showing an old lightly worn patina. There is an old repaired 4 1/2" crack forward of the lock, and a tight 3 1/2" crack along the upper edge of the wood left of the breech. Otherwise there are no additional repairs or damage. Blued steel buttplate, triggerguard, barrel bands & springs, sling swivels, and ramrod. The sideplate is brass. The action is crisp and functions perfectly. Overall a great example of an African trade musket that will display as well as it functions.
Large American Made Percussion Double Barrel Shotgun, 10 Ga, mfg. ca. 1850's. This is a wonderful looking old shotgun that very well may have been used for market hunting. The gun weighs nearly 9 1/2 lbs and features 27 3/4" Damascus barrels. The metal has a rich, dark plum patina with much wear around the locks from handling. Aside from a number "73" stamped under the barrels there are absolutely no markings or proofs anywhere which leads me to believe the gun is American made. The wood has a fantastic untouched and worn appearance, with coarse checkering on the wrist which is nearly smooth from wear. There are a few minor old chips and a 1 1/2" crack along the right upper edge of the forestock, but otherwise the wood is sound with no chips or repairs. Original steel buttplate, triggerguard, barrel wedge, and brass bead front sight. One ramrod pipe is missing, however the brass tipped wood ramrod is original. The upper barrel rib has an old repair 4" from the muzzle but appears sound and stable. Both hammers are matching originals and both actions function excellent. The left nipple is a clean original while the right nipple has partially broken. This is just a good, honest old American double barrel!
RARE! Massive 4 Gauge New England Market Hunter's Flintlock Punt Gun, Converted to Percussion, 4 Ga, mfg. ca. 1820. This huge shotgun was rested in the front of a punt boat and designed to bring down large numbers of waterfowl on a daily basis. The gun measures 6 feet, 3 1/2 inches long overall with a heavy English proofed 58" long barrel. The inside diameter of the bore is just over 1", while the breech measures 1 5/8" wide. The weight of the gun is just over 15 1/2 lbs. The metal has well used dark gray patina throughout, showing much exposure to salt water elements over the years. The lock is marked "CONWAY", and has been converted over to percussion during the period of use. The stock has been lightly cleaned at some point, and was made without a buttplate or triggerguard (the latter being so a mittened hand could easily access the trigger in cold conditions). There are some old, stable cracks between the locks screws and on the left side of the buttstock. Otherwise there are no chips or repairs. There was a small hole drilled through the buttstock for a rope to pass through, securing the gun to the bow of the boat to help absorb recoil. It appears to have been filled long ago. The barrel is secured by four brass bands (one missing). The wood ramrod is original, though it has been cleaned. The action is strong and works perfectly, while the nipple is original and intact. Early punt guns of this size are very hard to come by. This is an impressive, big waterfowl gun that will be a conversation starter in any collection!
Beautiful High Grade Belgium Percussion Double Barrel Shotgun with Gold Inlays & Dolphin Hammers, 12 Ga, mfg. ca. 1860's. This is a gorgeous high quality shotgun that remains in great original condition. The Damascus barrels measure 28" long and retain about 65% original pattern. The breech is Gold banded, and the upper rib is Gold inlaid "Warranted Laminated Steel". The locks are elaborately engraved with floral patterns and scenes of a dog chasing a Grouse. The hammers are superbly sculpted Dolphin's head motifs accompanied by matching floral engraving. The breech, barrel tang, steel buttplate, forend cap, wedge escutcheons, and triggerguard are finely engraved, the latter also depicting the image of a running Buck. The stock is deluxe grade burl wood featuring a checkered wrist and forearm. The wood has a beautiful untouched original patina with a brass shield nameplate inlaid above the toe. Aside from just a couple minute old chips on the left upper edge of the forestock there are no cracks, chips, or repairs. Original ramrod pipes, brass tipped wood ramrod, and bead front sight. Both actions are crisp and function perfectly, and both nipples are clean originals. We've had many old percussion doubles go through our hands over the years but rarely are they this nice! An impressive quality shotgun that is right at home in any antique arms collection.
M1842 Springfield US Percussion Military Musket, Altered to Musketoon Configuration, .69 cal smoothbore, mfg. 1848. This is a good looking, clean musket which was probably altered for use in the Civil War. The M1842 was the first standard percussion musket manufactured for the US military. The barrel has been shortened to 32" and the lock is marked "SPRING / FIELD / 1848" with "US" and eagle motif. The metal has an even plum/gray patina overall. The wood is very nice overall showing a warm, untouched look. There are a couple age checks forward of the buttplate along the left side and a tiny 1/2" crack forward of the rear lock screw. There is also some minor loss just behind the bolster. Otherwise there are no additional cracks, chips, or repairs. Original "US" marked buttplate, triggerguard, barrel bands & springs, and sling swivels. The action is strong and works very well, however it just barely will not hold full cock. Should be an easy fix. The nipple is a clean original and the iron ramrod is original. A nice example of a Civil War type musket that was probably shortened for artillery or cavalry use early on.
PRICE: $1,050
Wonderful Market Hunter's Percussion Double Barrel "Goose Gun" Shotgun with Scarce LONG 43" Barrels, 10 Ga, mfg. ca. 1850's. Single barrel fowlers of the 18th & 19th centuries were relatively simple to make and though rare, examples do exist with very long barrels, sometimes over six feet in length! With double barrel shotguns on the other hand, the longer the barrels are constructed, it becomes increasingly more difficult to keep the barrels from twisting, and the gun quickly becomes too heavy to shoulder. Weighing over 11 1/2 lbs, this sturdy, well made goose gun features very long 43" Damascus barrels. They feature a brass bead front sight with incomplete English proofs, leading me to believe this may be an American made gun using imported barrels. There are no other markings anywhere on the gun. The locks and furniture are very nicely engraved and show an even plum patina with sharp edges throughout. The barrels are equally as clean with no rust or pitting and much of the original browned Damascus finish remaining. The stock features a checkered wrist with an unusually long LOP for the era, measuring 13 1/2" to the rear trigger and 14 1/2" to the front trigger. The wood shows a wonderfully untouched original finish with no cracks, chips, or repairs whatsoever. Large steel buttplate, triggerguard, and forend tip with Nickel Silver wedge escutcheons and nameplate. Original ramrod pipes and brass tipped wood ramrod. Both hammers are matching originals and both actions function excellent (though the right hammer indexes further back than the left). Both nipples are original, however the right nipple is slightly damaged. This is a fantastic conversation piece! You just don't find doubles this long and certainly not in desirable 10 Gauge. Not to mention considering the abuse that most heavy waterfowl guns saw on a daily basis this gun is in incredibly fine condition.
Rare James Purdey & Sons Percussion Shotgun, Inscribed with Profusely Inlaid Stock, 11 Ga, mfg. ca. 1840's. This is an interesting and gorgeous looking gun made by one of the world's most famed gun makers. The English proofed Damascus barrel measures 36" long and features a Platinum "X" inlaid front sight band with a small blade sight which has worn down nearly flush with the barrel. The breech is engraved and inlaid with four Platinum bands. The barrel address is worn and only partially legible. The barrel tang and lock are finely engraved, the latter being marked "PURDY". The metal has a gray/brown patina overall. The nicely figured stock features a checkered wrist with a Nickel Silver nameplate inscribed "W. J. Wilcox". I did find several possible match ups for this name however further research will need to be done to pinpoint who he was. The stock is profusely inlaid with 22 additional Nickel Silver inlays including 13 stars (one missing), 3 birds, a rabbit, crocodile, starburst, a hunter at rest with dog, and a hunter firing with dog. The wood has a beautiful untouched look, and aside from a faint 3/4" crack just above the lock screw which is hardly worth noting, there are no chips, cracks, or repairs throughout. Finely engraved Nickel Silver buttplate, nipple compartment, triggerguard, wedge escutcheons, ramrod entry pipe, and forend cap. The ramrod and both pipes are missing. The action is mechanically crisp and works perfect, however the shaft which holds the hammer in place has broken. It appears to be a clean break and should not be a problem to repair. The nipple is a clean original. This is a wonderful looking gun that practically falls into the category of folk art. It will make a fine addition not only to any gun collection, but any folk art or Americana collection as well.
  RARE American Made Brass Barrel Flintlock Blunderbuss with United States Navy Markings, approx. 11 Ga with 1 3/16" flared muzzle, mfg. 1791. Blunderbuss' were generally not too popular in America during the 18th and 19th century and most that did see use here were imported from England. Very few were actually made in the US. This example is entirely American made and bares no maker's markings or proofs whatsoever (a primary indication of being American made). The brass barrel measures exactly 12" long and features a banded breech which is stamped "U.S.N.". Just below on the barrel tang in very small numbers is stamped the date "1791". The lock is lightly engraved. Overall the brass has a very pleasing dark patina while the lock has turned plum/gray. The stock remains totally original and untouched with a fantastic original look. Markings around the rear of the wrist indicate the gun was tied off at some point, presumably secured in a rack of some kind aboard a ship. There is an old crack which begins 2" forward of the lock and continues back to the tip of the triggerguard, then forward to a parallel point on the opposite side of the stock. There are a few additional cracks along the left side of the forestock. Luckily all of the cracks are very old and very stable. Simple flat stock brass buttplate is secured with small square head nails. Brass triggerguard, sideplate, and ramrod pipes. The brass tipped ramrod is original and even features a worm at the opposite end. The action functions as it should however seems a little weak. The hammer screw appears to be an old replacement. This gun has been in a private collection for years and is being offered to the public here for the first time. A very rare opportunity to own an all American made Navy issue blunderbuss. In all our years of collecting we have never seen another.
PRICE: Bid LIVE Online Now at
www.GunBroker.com
RARE & VERY UNUSUAL Williams & Powell Presentation Grade Breech-loading Percussion Poacher's Rifle, Engraved & Gold Plated with Screw Off Barrel & "Power" Family Crest, .42 cal, mfg. ca. 1840's. This is an incredibly interesting and unusual little
gun with some very rare features. "Poacher's" or "Taxidermist's" Rifles were made to be lightweight and easy to conceal, generally breaking down into two or three pieces. This rifle tips the scales at just 4 1/4 lbs! The barrel measures just shy of 24" long (25" including the trapdoor breech) and features a low bead front sight. The first 9" of what appears to be the barrel is actually a sleeve that the real barrel screws into. To load the gun, the barrel is unscrewed slightly and the breech opened. The powder and ball are loaded into the breech which is then closed and the barrel screwed tight which in return locks the breech shut. The barrel could also be fully unscrewed for transport or concealment. The gun is finely engraved throughout and the lock marked "WILLIAMS & POWELL". The top of the barrel sleeve is engraved "~LIVERPOOL~" with English proofs visible at the breech. The entire gun was originally gold plated, of which approximately 15-20% remain with vivid traces of gold on the buttplate, lock, triggerguard, sides of the barrel sleeve, and around the barrel breech. The remainder of the metal has turned a dark plum patina. The stock is nicely figured and features a checkered wrist with a fluted forend tip. The wood retains a wonderfully untouched patina with much original varnish remaining. There is a 1 3/4" long chip missing above the lock next to the barrel tang with a 5/8" crack forward of the lock screw and a fine old 1 3/4" crack on the left side of the forend tip. Otherwise the wood is sound with no additional cracks, chips, or repairs. A brass escutcheon atop the wrist in engraved with a crest and the words "PER CRUCEM AD CORONAM", or "By the cross, to a crown". This is the crest and motto of the "Power" family surname. The lug within the forearm which the barrel threads into is missing, so as the gun currently sits the barrel will slide in and out rather than screw or unscrew as it should. There is a set screw under the forearm which assists in holding the barrel in place. The action is crisp and functions perfect, while the original nipple is slightly bent from dry firing. The bore features very fine 22 groove rifling which is sharp with light blackpowder frosting. A good cleaning should improve it greatly. This is a very interesting and rare rifle from a noted quality English maker. 
P-1842 EIC British East India Company Pattern F Percussion "Brown Bess" Military Musket with Original Sling, .80 cal smoothbore, mfg. 1845-1851. The Pattern F EIC musket was the last re-design of the original P-1840 Brown Bess style percussion musket. This example is rather interesting in the fact that it shows no foreign import or regiment markings whatsoever and also has a tremendous amount of wear. The 39" barrel features a post front sight and fixed rear, while the lock bares the Lion motif of the East India Company. The metal has an even silvery "white" patina overall. The stock has a fantastic untouched original look with heavy wear and thick patina. Areas of the forearm are worn considerably below the barrel wedges and pins from handling. There is a small metal plate below the lock which covers and old crack and some minor wood loss in the typical spot behind the hammer. There is also a very faint 2" age crack on the left side of the stock opposite the lock. Overall the wood is very sound. Original brass buttplate, triggerguard, ramrod pipes, and forend cap show an untouched mellow color. The upper tip of the buttplate on which the gun is rested when loaded has seen so much use that it has actually worn through to wood beneath. Likewise the front sling swivel has worn clean through the ramrod entry pipe! When we come across guns that have seen this much use I find it fascinating to imagine where they have been. Original sing swivels, iron ramrod, and bayonet catch. The leather sling is in delicate condition but still intact and no doubt original to this gun. The action is crisp and functions excellent. The nipple is a clean original. If you're looking for a good EIC musket this is by far one of the nicer ones I have seen in recent years.
American Made Percussion Sporting Rifle with George Goulcher Lock & Double Set Triggers, .28 cal, mfg. ca. 1850. A well made and slender rifle intended for small game. Octagon barrel measures 34 3/4" long with a turned muzzle and low brass blade front sight. Rear sight is a fixed semi buckhorn. No visible markings on the barrel. The engraved trade lock is marked "G. GOULCHER". The metal has an even, dark patina with old, lightly mottled pitting on the surface of the barrel. The wood is equally untouched with an original worn appearance. There is a very small old chip and 1" age crack just forward of the nipple drum, with a 4" crack running through the lock screw on the opposite side. Additionally there is an old 6" crack on the left side of the forearm. Sharply curved brass buttplate and fancy triggerguard have literally turned black with age. Sculpted forend cap is made of pewter, and both ramrod pipes are original. The ramrod is missing. The action works well, though the hammer has some slop when in the resting position. Double set triggers will need adjusting. Nipple is a clean original. The bore is darker toward the muzzle but appears to have sharp rifling most of the way down. I think a good cleaning will improve it greatly. Overall an interesting and fine looking rifle for the money.
JOHN BROUGHTON
1866 US Military Prototype Rifle
Large Swiss B. Desponds Full Stock Percussion Jaeger Target/Hunting Rifle with Double Set Triggers, .70 cal, mfg. 1840's. This is a handsome big bore rifle that is in great original condition. Judging from the construction of the gun and large caliber I would venture to say it was intended for hunting/sporting use rather than target shooting. The heavy octagon barrel measures 38" long and 1 1/8" wide. The front sight is a large dovetailed blade. The rear sight is a large fixed post which contains a thin peep blade sandwiched in the middle. A small set screw allows the blade to be adjusted for elevation or windage. The top barrel flat is neatly stamped "B. DESPONDS" who was a quality gun maker in western Switzerland between 1816-1850. Interestingly the barrel was made in Belgium as evidenced by an "ELG" proof mark on the left flat of the breech. The lock appears to have originally been intended to be a flintlock however I do not believe the gun is a conversion. Since Desponds worked through the flintlock to percussion transition era he probably used an earlier lock he had on hand and built this rifle as a percussion. The breech shows no signs of converting. The barrel has a pleasing plum/blue patina while the lock and barrel tang are mottled with faded traces of case color. The robust stock features a cheekpiece and finely checkered wrist. The wood has a great original patina. There is an old expertly repaired 9" crack between the rear lock screw and first barrel wedge, and a 1/2" age check just forward of the lock. Otherwise the wood is sound and original with no other cracks, chips, or repairs. Thick brass buttplate, engraved lock screw escutcheons, elaborate target style triggerguard, ramrod pipes and wedge escutcheons. The large horn nose cap has no cracks, though there does appear to be a small square repair on the right upper edge. Original wood ramrod, rear sling swivel, and wing head lock screws. The action and double set triggers are crisp and function perfect. The nipple is a clean original. The bore is excellent with clean, deep 16 groove rifling. The rifle weighs a hefty yet well balanced 11 3/4 lbs. This is an impressive, well made big bore rifle that will make a great addition to any antique arms collection.
PRICE: SOLD
Rare Thomas French Flintlock Massachusetts Militia Musket, .69 cal smoothbore, mfg. 1830. These "New England' or "Massachusetts" militia muskets were built to be dual purpose arms to serve minutemen both at home and on the field. Their design shares attributes from standard military muskets of the day as well as civilian fowling pieces. This example was made by famed gun maker Thomas French of Canton, most famous for his 1808 US contract muskets. The barrel is stamped "T.F. 1830" below a "PF" proof (Proof Massachusetts). The barrel measures 39" long and features a short low blade front sight with a bayonet lug fixed under the muzzle. The lightly engraved lock is a trade piece marked "LONDON / WARRANTED". The barrel has a rich plum color while the lock exhibits a mixture of silvery/brown patina with crisp, sharp edges. The stock features a checkered wrist with a brass nameplate escutcheon. Overall the wood is in fantastic original condition. Aside from a 1 1/8"x3/16" chip behind the forend cap on the right side (hardly worth noting), the stock has no cracks or repairs whatsoever. Even the raised grain of the wood is still visible! The wood has a warm untouched patina and has never been cleaned. There is a thin coat of varnish added which may or may not be original, but at any rate it is very old and much has worn away. Brass musket style forend cap, ramrod pipes, sideplate, triggerguard, and buttplate. Tulip head iron ramrod. The action is crisp and functions perfect. Even the frizzen clicks shut and snaps forward. These guns are very difficult to find in their original flintlock configuration, and even more difficult to acquire in such fine condition. Certainly the best Massachusetts militia musket we have offered.
Wonderful American Made Long Flintlock Fowler with English Barrel & R. Ashmore & Son Lock, Converted to Percussion, 20 Ga, mfg. ca. 1820's. This great looking fowler features a long 44 1/2" barrel which is English proofed and engraved "LONDON" along the top. It features a small steel post front sight with a grooved/sighted breech. The lightly engraved lock is made by English trade lock maker R. Ashmore & Son and is so marked. The metal has an overall gray/brown patina. The wood is in very good condition and has a pleasing worn look. It may have been lightly cleaned at some point but doesn't have any cracks or repairs. There's a few small old chips around the barrel tang but nothing you wouldn't expect to find on a gun this old. Lightly engraved brass buttplate and triggerguard show nice patina, the latter having a starburst motif engraved on the bow. Original brass ramrod entry pipe with iron thimbles. The wood ramrod is original to the gun from the period of use. The action is strong and functions very well and the nipple is a clean original. Overall just a nice, solid early American fowling piece that looks terrific over the fireplace!
Rare English William Milsted 7 Gauge Flintlock Market Shotgun "Punt Gun", Converted to Percussion, 7 Ga, mfg. ca. 1830. This is a great looking big bore market gun that was used right along the eastern US coast. Damascus barrel measures 32 1/4" long with a brass bead front sight. Inside diameter of the bore measures approx. .875" and the breech is over 1 1/2" wide. Lock is engraved "Milsted". The metal has an even plum brown patina overall with light engraving on the lock, hammer, barrel tang, and triggerguard. The stock features a checkered wrist and German Silver nameplate escutcheon. The wood has a wonderful untouched worn appearance. There is a fine 2 1/2" age crack forward of the lock and a 1/2" crack forward of the lock screw, otherwise the wood is sound with no other cracks or chips. Considering how much hard use these market guns saw on a daily basis, this gun is in very good condition overall. Steel buttplate, triggerguard, and long double keyed forearm with German Silver wedge escutcheons and a horn forend cap. One original ramrod pipe which has been resoldered long ago, and original wood ramrod. The action is tight and functions perfect, and the nipple is a clean original. Early big bore waterfowl guns are becoming increasingly difficult to find. This is a handsome and impressive gun for the money!
A rare chance to own real, vintage factory barrel stampings! Factory stamps do not turn up often, and judging from the collection these came from they were probably in use at the Ruger Firearms Co. They all roughly measure 4" long, 1 3/16" wide, and 3/8" thick. These would date to the 1950's/60's. All are in excellent usable condition, and some feature very light surface rust that cleans right off with little effort. They are marked by either "Taylor & Helander / New Britain, Conn." or "Noble & Westbrook / E. Hartford, CT."
PRICE: $100 EACH
.358 NORMA MAG.
.350 REM. MAG.
.300 WIN. MAG.
.358 WIN.
7 MM REM. MAG.
.280 REM.
.284 WIN.
7X57 MAUSER
.264 WIN. MAG.
.308 NORMA MAG.
30-06 CAL.
22-250 REM.
VERY RARE James Spencer Brass Barreled Flintlock Blunderbuss from the "Golden Age" of Piracy, 6 Ga with 1 3/8" flared muzzle, mfg. 1687-1698. This is an extraordinarily rare gun which just surfaced from an old Massachusetts collection. There is a nearly identical example of this blunderbuss on display in the Pitt Rivers Museum at the University of Oxford in Oxford, England. James Spencer was a gun maker in London who was apprenticed to Thomas Towle, turned over to John Tarles, through the early 1680's. By about 1687 Spencer was on his own as a gun maker to
Scare Virginia Manufactory 2nd Model (Transitional) M1795 Flintlock Musket Lock, mfg. 1813. These guns were produced in Richmond from approximately 1802-1821 and were on hand by the thousands in many southern armories at the outbreak of the Civil War. The Richmond Armory alone held 50,000 flintlock muskets, many of which were Virginia Manufactory guns. It is assumed that these were pressed into Confederate service until subsequent percussion muskets or conversions could be issued. These guns are considered to be secondary Confederate longarms. Overall this lock is in great shape with sharp edges and good, legible markings. The metal has been cleaned however the action is tight and functions flawlessly. I suspect that the top jaw and jaw screw are later replacements, and probably the frizzen screw. Otherwise all components are original. A great display piece just as it sits or the start of a Civil War musket build!
Very Nice & Unusual European Double Barrel Shotgun, 10 Ga, mfg. ca. 1890. This is a well made gun that is in great condition for it's age. I can't identify the proof marks under the barrel however the gun may have been made by V. Charles Schilling of Germany as evidenced by the "VCS" marking. The Damascus barrels measure just shy of 26" with a small blade front sight. The metal has an even silvery/gray patina throughout with clean, sharp edges. The wood is nicely figured and retains a wonderful untouched finish. The wrist and forearm are coarsely checkered, and the large forend cap is made of horn. Aside from a few minute age checks behind the locks and a tiny chip on the right rear corner of the forestock there are no cracks, chips, or repairs. Original steel buttplate and triggerguard, and the gun is fitted with front & rear sling swivels. Both hammers are matching originals and both actions function perfect. Both firing pins are freely moving. Barrels lock up tight with no play in the action. The bores are excellent for a blackpowder shotgun of this age with a smooth and shiny appearance and very minimal frosting visible. Weight of the gun is just over 8 1/2 lbs, LOP is approx. 13" to rear trigger, 14" to front. Overall this is a nicely made and unusual shotgun with a terrific look and feel!
PRICE: SOLD
RARE Robert S. Eastman, Brunswick, Maine, Market Hunter's 6 Gauge Percussion Punt Gun/Shotgun, 6 Ga, mfg. 1864. A rarely encountered all-American made market gun by a very scarce maker. The heavy Damascus barrel measures 37" long with a large brass bead front sight. The bore measures approx. .920" and the breech is 1 5/8" wide. There are no proofs of any kind under the barrel indicating that this gun was entirely made in America, unlike many makers who imported English barrels. The top of the breech is stamped "R. S. EASTMAN / 1864", while the lock is also stamped "R. S. EASTMAN". Overall the metal has a mottled dark gray/brown patina. The wood has an untouched original oil finish showing much wear and use typical of a coastal heavy waterfowl gun. There is a very fine yet sturdy crack over the top of the wrist (not all the way through) with an old 3/4"x3/8" filled chip behind the barrel tang. Additionally there is an old repaired 4" crack on the right side of the forestock with a 6" and 2" crack on the left side. A 2 1/2" sliver of wood has been expertly fitted long ago between the lock screws near the barrel. Massive iron barrel tang and triggerguard. The original buttplate and large wedge escutcheons are made of brass. Very large sculpted Pewter forend cap. The lower barrel rib, pipes, and ramrod are missing. The action is crisp and strong featuring just one click. The nipple is a clean original. A chance to own an impressive New England big bore market gun from a nearly unheard of maker!  
Rare (Charles or Henry) Egg, London, High Quality Percussion Single Barrel Fowling Shotgun, 16 Ga, mfg. ca. 1850's. This is a wonderful looking, very serviceable fowling piece from the highly renowned Egg family of English gun makers. I would venture to say this was made by either Charles or Henry Egg. The Damascus barrel is English proofed and engraved "London" on the top flat. It measures 30 1/2" and features a bead front sight with an engraved breech & tang, as well as a Platinum band. The back action lock is finely engraved and marked "EGG". The hammer is engraved with a fish head style motif. Overall the metal has an even plum/gray patina with clean surfaces and sharp edges. The stock is very nicely figured and of a deluxe grade. The wood has been sanded and cleaned at some point, and the checkering on the wrist possibly re-cut. Aside from some very faintly repaired checks along the top edges of the forestock and a repaired/blended crack on the left side of the forestock, the wood is very sound with no chips or damage otherwise. Nicely engraved German Silver nameplate escutcheon atop the wrist with matching wedge escutcheons. Engraved steel buttplate, triggerguard, and ramrod entry pipe. The forend cap appears to have been omitted at the time the wood was restored. Original ramrod pipes and excellent original brass tipped wood ramrod. The action is crisp and functions perfectly, and the nipple is a clean replacement. This is a very scarce, attractive, and well balanced shotgun that functions as well as it looks.
PRICE: SOLD
PRICE: SOLD
Excellent J. E. Harder, Clearfield, Pennsylvania, Percussion Over/Under Combination Rifle/Shotgun, .34 cal & 20 Ga, mfg. ca. 1860's. This is a fantastic, well built combination gun in great original condition. The heavy, thick walled barrels measure 34 3/4" long and are in remarkable condition! The gun weighs a hefty 11 1/4 lbs. Combination guns such as this were difficult to manufacture and therefore quite costly. Overall the metal has an even plum brown patina with clean surfaces and sharp, crisp edges. The top rifle barrel is fitted with a dovetailed German Silver blade front sight and a semi buckhorn rear. The top barrel flat is clearly stamped "J. E. HARDER MAKER / CLEARFIELD PA". The locks are stamped with engraved scroll motifs. The stock features a cheekpiece with a brass star inlay opposite a brass patchbox. The wood has a pleasing untouched original finish. There appears to be two short chips of wood that were repaired (with the original pieces) just forward of the buttplate tang, probably the result of being dropped or hit on it's heel. Otherwise there are no additional cracks, chips, or repairs. Original brass buttplate & toeplate, iron triggerguard, and six iron ramrod pipes. Both wood ramrods appear to be either well maintained originals or nicely made old replacements. The brass tip of one rod is missing. The right action fires the top rifle barrel and functions perfectly. The left action which fires the lower shotgun barrel just barely will not hold full cock. Both nipples are perfect originals. Overall a very fine example of a robust Pennsylvania made combination gun! 
RARE & IMPORTANT ~ 1 of 2 Known ~ Majors, Russell & Co. "Pony Express" Large Percussion Double Barrel Stagecoach Guard Shotgun, 9 Ga, mfg. ca. 1855. Majors, Russell & Co. (later Russell, Majors, & Waddell) was a freighting and staging firm that existed between 1854-1862. Originally contracted to supply military posts in the west, they later operated various stagecoach lines, communications services, and express mail transportation. They were the company who in 1860 founded the famous Pony Express which lasted for only 19 months. In 1862 the remains of the company were bought by "Stagecoach King" Ben Holladay. There is only one other "Majors, Russell & Co." marked shotgun currently known to exist which was part of the William R. Orbelo collection sold by Little John's Auction Service in 2010. At the time, that gun was the only known example. The gun was a 10 Gauge and featured shorter barrels, but was otherwise a nearly identical pattern. As quoted by Little John's Auction pertaining to the 10 Gauge: "The firm of Russell, Majors, and Waddell were freighters, stagecoach operators, and originators of the Pony Express. This gun appears American and this is the only known original marked specimen for Majors, Russell & Co. as the firm was only in business for two years and this marking is absolutely engraved at the time of the gun’s manufacture. Mr. Orbelo confirmed the Huntington Library and Wells Fargo museum curator that this is the only known marked specimen from this early stagecoach company...A museum quality artifact...Est: $10,000 - $20,000". The shotgun offered here is a large 9 Gauge featuring heavy 41 1/2" Damascus barrels. The barrels show an incomplete English proof suggesting the gun was built in America with imported English barrels. The breech is platinum banded with a long engraved arrow motif at the muzzle. Original brass bead front sight and wide 3/4" upper rib which is engraved "LONDON FINE TWIST". The barrels and rib are period stamped "R.A.C." (three times). I have not been able to identify these marks but clearly they must represent initials of either the gun's owner or stagecoach line. The engraved locks are both marked "MAJORS RUSSELL & Co" within a scroll boarder. Overall the metal has a deep plum patina with a light film of grease or oil from years of hanging in a private collection. The stock shows a worn, untouched patina with much wear particularly around the forestock. Aside from a couple faint age checks around the right lock and a few small old chips along the edge of the forestock (and one behind the left lock) there are no notable cracks, chips, or repairs. Engraved iron buttplate, large spurred triggerguard, and double keyed forestock. Original ramrod pipes, and the original brass tipped wood ramrod also features a detachable worm. Both hammers are matching originals and both actions function very well. Both nipples are clean originals. This is a very important piece of wild west history. It is very difficult to find an authentic coach gun of any type, but to find something so rare and linked to the Pony Express makes this a prize in any antique arms or western collection. Not to mention it is a large, big bore shotgun! Apparently whoever rode "shotgun" on a stagecoach with this piece wanted to intimidate any potential robbers!
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PRICE: $1,500
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PRICE: $6,500
PRICE: $950
PRICE: SALE PENDING
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RARE John Hall New York Deluxe Double Set Trigger New England Long Rifle with Birdseye Maple Stock & American Eagle Patchbox, .36 cal, mfg. 1848-1851. This is an absolutely gorgeous rifle made by a rather obscure maker. John Hall worked at 91 Fulton St., New York, NY for a very brief period of time, about three years. The rifle features a 38 3/4" octagon barrel with a low
German Silver blade front sight and fixed rear sight. The top barrel flat is engraved "J. Hall New York". The breech is engraved and triple Platinum banded. The hammer and lock are engraved, and marked "J. HALL". There is a chip missing from the leading edge of the hammer cone that strikes the nipple. The barrel has two wedges to hold it in place. The stock is made from Birdseye Maple and features a checkered wrist and a cheekpiece. There is a repaired crack under the lock toward the rear, and a 1 1/2" crack through the lock screw on the opposite side. There is also 2 3/4" crack/chip on the right upper edge of the forestock. There is a Nickel Silver nameplate on top of the wrist, and a Silver nameplate on the left side opposite the lock. There are two large engraved Nickel Silver inlays on the left side of the buttstock, and a large engraved Nickel Silver patchbox on the right side. A beautiful American Eagle is engraved on the patchbox door. The iron buttplate is engraved and has a small button on top which is pressed to open the patchbox below. The toeplate and triggerguard are also engraved iron. The pin to hold the front of the triggerguard in place is missing. The four barrel wedge escutcheons (one missing) and forend cap are Nickel Silver, while the ramrod entry pipe is Silver. One ramrod pipe is missing while the other is present. The ramrod appears to be original or at least period to the gun. It must be swelled slightly as it seems to be stuck at the present. The hammer cocks into one position and functions excellent, while the double set triggers function flawlessly. The bore could use a quick cleaning but overall is excellent with strong rifling front to back. This is a very impressive and unusual early American rifle!
PRICE: $375
JAMES PURDEY & SONS
Gun & Rifle Makers
~ L O N D O N ~
PRICE: SOLD
RARE Alexander McComas Baltimore, Maryland Percussion Pennsylvania Long Rifle with Double Set Triggers, .38 cal, mfg. ca. 1850. Alexander McComas is recognized as one of the most highly sought after custom American gun makers of the mid 19th century. His rifles and shotguns were of the highest quality and made to
order. Needless to say they are rarely encountered today. This rifle features a heavy 36" octagon barrel with a fixed blade front sight and two rear sight dovetails. The rear sight is a later Marbles rifle sight, fixed to the original sight base. A Nickel Silver inlay along the top barrel flat is engraved "McCOMAS BALTIMORE". The lock and hammer are lightly engraved and marked "McCOMAS / WARRANTED". Overall the metal has an even brown/gray patina. The stock is very nicely figured with a checkered wrist and cheekpiece. There are three pieces of wood expertly re-fitted around lock/breech area on both sides. They appear to be done at the period, and I would not be surprised if they were done by McComas himself as a modification to the stock's drop. Aside from two very fine age cracks just forward of the triggerguard the wood is very sound with a pleasing patina. There is a large Silver inlay on the cheekpiece, while the barrel wedge escutcheons and wrist nameplate are Nickel Silver. The buttplate, patchbox, triggerguard, forend cap, and ramrod pipes are brass. The decorative lower plate of the patchbox is missing, and the button to open the patchbox is also missing. The lock screw appears to be a later replacement. The ramrod is original, and there is a small hole drilled through the barrel rib presumably for a sling of some kind. The action and double set triggers are tight and work very well, however you must pull the rear trigger first to cock the gun, then fire with the front trigger. The bore is good with worn yet visible rifling. This is a wonderful looking rifle from one of the most collectible American makers.
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RARE Edwin Piper Philadelphia Percussion Live Pigeon Shotgun, 10 Ga, mfg. 1870's. In the early days of Trap shooting, real pigeons were released from traps and fired at during tournaments. The guns used by clubs and pigeon shooting competitors were specifically made to be light weight and quick pointing with no provision for a ramrod. Since these were strict competitions, the gun were loaded by a designated person or persons to ensure the same legally allowed charge was used each time. Live Pigeons guns are extremely difficult to find today, and to find one that is entirely American made is a true rarity. Edwin Piper was a long time co-worker for the quality Philadelphia gun maker Edward K. Tryon. He eventually established his own firm as a gunsmith at 1347 So. Second St. between approximately 1868-1886 (though various sources seem to all give slightly different dates). At any rate, Piper focussed more on gunsmithing than he did gun making, so naturally very few guns actually made by him have surfaced today. This is an excellent example of an original Live Pigeon gun that is entirely made by Edwin Piper. The gun features a 32" Damascus barrel with a full top rib and bead front sight. The barrel is completely unmarked with no proofs. Most American makers during this period actually used raw English barrels which will be found with incomplete English proofs. The absence of any proof marks leads me to believe that Piper made the barrel. The lock is marked "E. PIPER / PHILADA". The barrel retains a very pleasing browned patina while the case colored lock has turned gray/brown. The wood is very nicely figured with a finely checkered wrist and forearm. It retains much of it's original finish and has a nicely fluted cap incorporated into the tip of the forearm. There is a fine 1" age crack forward of the lock screw, but otherwise there are no other cracks, chips, or repairs. Original steel buttplate and triggerguard with light engraving throughout. The action is extremely crisp and tight, it functions perfectly. The nipple is very clean. This gun was the subject of an article entitled "One For The Birds" in the April 1980 issue of the Pennsylvania Antique Gun Collector's Association "Monthly Bugle" newsletter, and was appraised by James D. Julia in 2008 for $2,500-4,000. A very fine example of an intriguing and rare American shotgun!
Scarce American Made Sidehammer "Mule Ear" Percussion Sporting Rifle with James A. Strong, Vicksburg, Michigan Lock, .45 cal, mfg. ca. 1870. This attractive rifle features a 33 1/2" octagon barrel with a dovetailed brass bead front sight and fixed semi buckhorn rear. There is a very faint filled dovetail about 4" behind the rear sight from a previous sight that was omitted during the period. The lock is marked "J. A. STRONG". James Strong was a gunsmith and maker in Vicksburg, Michigan through the 1870's. It is possible that he could have built this entire gun though I can not find any markings on the barrel. Otherwise it could have been an unknown maker who used one of Strong's locks. Overall the metal has an even silvery/gray patina. The wood is nicely figured and retains it's original untouched finish. There is a 1 1/4" crack behind the lock with a few very small checks forward of it. There is also a 1 1/2" crack visible at the toe of the buttstock. Otherwise there are no additional cracks, chips, or repairs. Brass buttplate, toeplate, patchbox, and triggerguard. The large forend cap is Pewter. There is one original ramrod pipe remaining and signs of additional pipes along the bottom flat of the barrel which are now missing. The brass tipped wood ramrod is original. The action is strong and functions perfectly and the nipple is a clean original. The bore could use a light cleaning but appears to have strong and crisp rifling front to back. The barrel sits slightly loose in the stock as I believe the wedge/pin may need to refastened. Overall a great looking and unusual 19th century sporting rifle!
PRICE: $850
Desirable C. H. Thomas & Co. Louisville, Kentucky Percussion Half Stock Frontier Rifle, ID'd, .32 cal, mfg. ca. 1840. This is an interesting rifle that deserved further research. I can not find any information regarding the firm C. H. Thomas & Co. It may be affiliated to a noted "H. Thomas" who worked around Louisville in the 1830's and later moved to Illinois in the 1840's. There was a C. H. Thomas & Co. hardware store that existed for a brief time but they were located in Illinois as well. The rifle features a 33" octagon barrel with a thick dovetailed front sight and fixed rear. The top barrel flat is marked "C. H. THOMAS & Co. / LOUISVILLE KY" followed by a hand stamped date "1822". I don't believe the rifle to date quite that early, however it may be a birth year for the original owner of the gun who stamped his name "P. BILL 1858" along the left side of the barrel. The metal has a dark gray/brown patina overall. The stock features a cheekpiece and military style brass patchbox. The wood has a pleasing untouched original look showing moderate wear and patina. There are some old, tight age checks along the right side of the forearm with a few cracks between the barrel pin and forend cap. There is also a faint crack at the toe of the buttstock, and a couple small checks by the lock screw from over tightening. Slight wood loss in the typical spot behind the hammer alongside the barrel tang. Overall the wood is very sound and stable with no other cracks, chips, or repairs. Brass buttplate, triggerguard, forend cap, and ramrod entry pipe. The ramrod pipes appear to have been resoldered or replaced over the years, and the wood ramrod appears original to the period of use. The action and double set triggers function perfect and the nipple is a clean original. The bore could use a quick cleaning but has very sharp, crisp rifling front to back. This is a great looking and unusual rifle that definitely deserves further research. I have seen very few guns with Louisville, Kentucky markings. 
Very Unusual & Interesting Full Stock Flintlock Kentucky Long Rifle, Nickel Plated with American Eagle Inlay, Converted to Percussion, .44 cal, mfg. ca. 1820. This is a large and impressive looking rifle that has some unusual European styling. The gun weighs a hefty 13 1/4 lbs and the heavy octagon barrel measures 46 1/2" long! Front sight is a tall fixed post while the rear is a small dovetailed "V" notch. The barrel, lock, and furniture retain 90%+ of an older 20th century applied Nickel finish. There are no visible markings on either the lock or barrel. The wood is in very good condition overall considering the weight and length of this rifle. There are a couple fine 1" cracks behind the lock with a 2" crack under the bottom rear corner, and an old repaired 4" crack forward of the lock. There is also a fine old repaired 2 3/4" crack that runs horizontal through the lock screw. The wood has a relatively thick old coat of varnish added which appears to have some artificial color added. Large Swiss style brass buttplate with huge 10 1/2" long fancy brass patchbox. The inside of the patchbox is lined with green velvet. Large 6 1/4" brass scroll toeplate and matching sideplate with a wonderful 4 1/8" wide engraved brass American Eagle inlay on the cheekpiece. The fancy brass triggerguard is somewhat crudely cast and the first 1/2" of the tip appears to have broken away. Original ramrod pipes with large brass forend cap. The wood ramrod shows some age and is at least from the period the gun was Nickel plated. The hammer pulls back and releases strong but just barely will not hold half or full cock. The nipple is a clean older replacement. The bore has worn yet visible rifling. A good cleaning would probably improve it greatly. If you're looking for a big, impressive conversation piece to hang over your fireplace this is it!  
PRICE: SALE PENDING
Fantastic George Tryon, Philadelphia, Heavy Barrel Percussion Half Stock Plains Rifle with C. L. Barnes Lock & Double Set Triggers, .40 cal, mfg. ca. 1840's. This is a great looking, big plains rifle weighing about 11 3/4 lbs. The heavy octagon barrel measures 32" long and 1 1/8" wide across the flats. It features a nice brass dovetailed low blade front sight with a long adjustable rear. The top of the barrel is faintly marked "TRYON / PHILDA". The finely engraved back action trade lock is signed "C. L. BARNES". The metal has a pleasing dark plum patina with a little roughness toward the muzzle but a generally clean and sharp appearance overall. The stock is nicely figured and features a carved upper comb. It is clean and sharp overall with little very handling mars. There is a small piece of wood replaced just forward of the lock with a faint 1" check above the lock. There is another 1" crack between the bottom of the lock to the trigger assembly, and two very faint 1" cracks just forward of the lock screw escutcheon. Sharply curved brass buttplate and toeplate, with brass triggerguard and polished pewter forend cap. The brass lock screw escutcheon is crosshatch engraved with stars, and the left wedge escutcheon has a lovely and rather unusual engraved crescent moon & star motif. A small brass escutcheon atop the wrist is engraved with a shield and the initials "DP". Original ramrod pipes and brass tipped wood ramrod, which if not original is at least a very old well done replacement. The action and double set triggers function perfect and the nipple is a clean original. The bore could use a quick cleaning but appears to be very clean with good, strong rifling front to back. Overall just a well built, quality plains rifle. Tryon made many guns, including government purchased trade guns, that went west to the frontier.
PRICE: $1,250
Massive Full Stock Kentucky "Bench Rest" Flintlock Target Rifle with Tiger Maple Stock & Double Set Triggers, Converted to Percussion, .60 cal, mfg. ca. 1830-1840. This is one impressive rifle! The gun weighs 16 lbs yet remains relatively well balanced for it's size. The heavy octagon barrel measures 44 1/2" long and 1 5/16" wide. There are no markings on either the barrel or lock to indicate who made the rifle. The metal has a silvery patina overall with light engraving on the lock. The front sight has been replaced with a contemporary hooded target sight, while the rear sight, also contemporary, is a fully adjustable peep mounted to a 7 1/2" platform. Two old filled dovetails can be seen on the top barrel flat from a sight or scope mounted during the period. The stock is in very good condition overall considering the size and age of this gun. A thin coat of varnish has been added long ago which has crazed a little from heat and time, but the wood has not been sanded and still retains a warm, original look. There is a little wood loss just in front of the nipple & drum above the lock which has been filled with a wax of some kind. There is a super thin 1 1/2" sliver missing from the right upper edge of the forestock near the muzzle and a 3/8" crack forward of the rear lock screw. Otherwise there are no additional cracks, chips, or repairs. Brass buttplate, toeplate, triggerguard, sideplate, ramrod pipes, and large Kentucky style patchbox. The patchbox door springs open via a long button located on the toeplate. All of the brass has a mellow, uncleaned patina. The barrel is secured by four iron wedges. The wood ramrod is original. The action and double set triggers are crisp and function perfect (the rear trigger must first be set, then the hammer cocked). The nipple is a clean old replacement. The bore is excellent featuring deep eight groove rifling with clean and sharp lands & grooves. This is a big, handsome Kentucky rifle that not only displays well but is still serviceable for target shooting or hunting.
PRICE: $875
Rare & Unusual American Made Swivel Breech Percussion Over/Under Double Barrel Shotgun with Trenton Lock, 12 Ga, mfg. ca. 1870. This interesting gun appears to be unmarked as to who made it aside from it's "TRENTON" marked trade lock. The Damascus barrels measure 32 1/2" long and each feature a very small German Silver blade front sight. There is one action with one trigger to fire the gun. The forward trigger is pulled to release the barrels which are manually rotated. The alternate barrel then locks into place ready for firing. Overall the metal has a very rich plum patina. The robust stock features a smooth pistol grip and retains a totally untouched original patina. There are no cracks, chips, or repairs whatsoever. Original steel buttplate, triggerguard, and ramrod pipes to mount one ramrod along the side of the barrels. The wood ramrod is original to the gun from the period. One of the barrels has a few slight dings about 10 1/2" back from the muzzle. The other barrel is a little thin at the muzzle. The action is strong and functions very well. The forward trigger functions correctly, and the barrels swivel and click into place as they should. There is considerable play between the barrels and action. Both nipples are clean originals. Overall a very interesting and unusual gun that is certainly a conversation piece!
RARE Nathan H. Foster, Framingham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Flintlock Half Stock New England Smooth Rifle with Tiger Maple Stock and Daniel Dana Lock, mfg. ca. 1815, .58 cal smoothbore. This is an awesome example of an early New England rifle by a very rare maker. Nathan H. Foster is listed as a gunsmith to Middlesex County, Massachusetts ca. 1815. Since acquiring this rifle I have not been able to find another example of his work. The rifle features a 37 1/2" smoothbore octagon barrel suitable for ball or shot. It is fitted with a brass bead front sight and no provision for a rear sight other than a crowned barrel tang. There is a faintly filled small dovetail just forward of the barrel tang at the breech. The top barrel flat is very nicely engraved "Nathan H. Foster". The lock is marked "D. DANA". Daniel Dana of Canton, Massachusetts, was a noted maker of military contract locks. Overall the metal has a pleasing dark plum patina. The stock is a beautiful piece of Tiger Maple featuring a raised cheekpiece and checkered wrist. The wood has a wonderful untouched patina throughout. There is an old crack through the wrist which has been sturdily repaired during the period with two screws. Additionally there is a fine 2" crack behind the rear lock screw and a 1 1/2" crack between the front lock screw and triggerguard. The rear top edge of the forestock is missing a 2 1/2" sliver of wood and there is an old worn chip near the toe of the buttstock. A small button on top of the brass buttplate springs open the patchbox door which is nicely engraved in typical New England pattern. Sleek brass triggerguard with brass ramrod pipes and lock screw escutcheons. The forend cap is made of horn, while the wedge escutcheons are German Silver. Original brass tipped wood ramrod. The action pulls strong to full cock (no half cock), locks up, and tightly releases. The frizzen snaps shut and springs forward. Upon close examination the frizzen spring may be a well done replacement. Overall this is a beautiful and rare New England rifle with a honest look that will make a fine addition to any antique arms collection.
One of a kind!
PRICE: $3,500
UNIQUE & IMPORTANT John Broughton 1866 (M1868 Patent) Lever Action US Army Prototype Military Rifle, .50 cal, mfg. 1866. A truly rare and fascinating piece of US military history that is being offered here for the first time ever. John Broughton of New York was an inventor who developed this design around the end of the Civil War and made this very prototype in 1866. The profile of the receiver was certainly inspired in part by the Henry rifle or M1866 Winchester. The system is a very efficiently made lever action that holds and fires a single cartridge at a time (remember that the military was not fond of repeaters during and after the Civil War). John Broughton traveled to the Paris Universal Exposition in 1867 and brought with him this prototype, which though not entered in the exhibition was shown to some very eager US military commissioners. A full report of the prototype model is described within the book "Reports of The United States Commissioners to The Paris Universal Exposition of 1867". On April 14th 1868 a patent was granted to Broughton for this design, which is registered as US Patent No. 76595. For the upcoming US Government Breechloading Rifle Trials of 1872, Broughton prepared a fully functioning example of this rifle, as well as two other rifles of different designs. The government was looking for a new standard Army rifle to replace the Springfield rifled musket and 99 different rifles were tested. The Broughton 1868 Patent rifle was noted as number 18, while his other rifles were numbers 45 and 79. Ultimately the army settled with number 99, which became the M1873 Springfield Trapdoor. The prototype offered here is the original model which was examined in Paris during 1867, and was used to obtain Broughton's patent in 1868. The entire gun is constructed of brass and is fully operational. It measures 13" long overall and is engraved on top of the receiver "John Broughton / New York / USA / 1866". Upon operating the lever the breechblock is dropped, extractor returned, and the hammer placed to the half cock position. The lever closes and clicks shut, and the hammer can then be pulled to full cock. The brass has a perfectly untouched dark patina, while the bobbed buttstock and forearm show an equally pleasing untouched and original look with no cracks or chips. This is a "must have" for the US military arms collector who has it all!  
PRICE: $1,250
PRICE: SALE PENDING
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RARE Massive Ivory Hunter's Bentley & Playfair 4 Bore Percussion Smooth Rifle (Elephant Gun), 4 Bore, mfg. ca. 1850. These huge smooth bore rifles were the choice weapon of Safari and Ivory hunters of the mid 19th century. Famous hunters Frederick Selous and Sir Samuel Baker both used crude, massive smooth rifles very similar to this. Extreme accuracy was not important due to the close range hunter's preferred against Elephants, and a smooth bore could be reloaded much faster than a rifled barrel. The lock and barrel of this gun were manufactured in England by Bentley & Playfair and exported to South Africa where the rifle was stocked by Dutch colonists. The rifle weighs 13 3/4 lbs and features a 33" octagon barrel. The barrel measures 1 3/8" across the flats, and the bore measures 1.185" (slightly larger to accommodate wadding around the quarter pound 1.052" caliber lead ball). Original dovetailed iron bead front sight and fixed blade rear. The lock is marked "BENTLEY & PLAYFAIR", while "BIRMINGHAM" is faintly visible on the top barrel flat. Africa export number "K2656" is stamped on the left side of the breech. The metal has a silvery/brown patina overall. The stock features a deep "roach belly" which was a common trait of Dutch South African guns. Overal considering where this gun has been and the massive recoil it generates the wood is very solid and sound. There is a 2" sliver missing forward of the lock, with a 1 1/2" crack forward of the lock screw and a 3" crack behind (both stable). There is an old repaired crack around the barrel wedge on the right side of the forestock and a 1 1/2" chip missing at the point where the ramrod enters the wood. There are also a few age checks on the left side of the buttstock. Otherwise the wood has a well worn, untouched look. Original iron buttplate, triggerguard, ramrod pipes and ramrod. The action is crisp and functions perfect, while the nipple is a clean original. The bore is clean and looks good. These big bore Elephant guns do not turn up and are very rare!
ordnance until 1698 when he became ill, dying in 1699. This gun would have no doubt been built for use aboard a ship. It is well balanced to be carried with one hand and would be braced against the hip when fired. The brass barrel measures 13 1/2" long and is about 6 Gauge in caliber with a 1 3/8" flared muzzle. The top of the breech is engraved "IA SPENCER", for James Spencer (the letters "I" and "J" were often used to represent the same meaning in old English text). Additionally the barrel is proofed with James Spencer's mark of "IS" below a crown. The barrel is a three stage design and maintains a fantastic mellow patina. The lock is finely engraved and marked "SPENCER". All lock components, including the top jaw and screw are original. The metal has a dark, untouched patina overall. The wood is absolutely the original stock and shows much honest wear and use. Both sides of the buttstock are branded "AT". The toe of the buttstock has a very, very old repaired chip with a 6" crack on the right side and a 4" age check on the left side. There is an old repaired crack just forward of the lock which extends about 6", and a 2 5/8" crack near the muzzle. The left side of the forestock has just a few very minute cracks near the muzzle with a small crack and chip about half way down the barrel. Considering this gun is literally well over 300 years old and was used at sea I'm impressed that the wood is intact at all! Original brass buttplate is simple flat stock secured by five small forged nails. The triggerguard is also secured by two forged iron nails. The wrist escutcheon is missing and has been filled long ago, however both original nails are still present and the Pitt Rivers Museum blunderbuss could serve as a pattern to replicate the escutcheon if desired since it has the exact piece that this gun would have had. Original floral pattern sideplate and brass ramrod pipe. The forward lock screw is a later replacement. The wood ramrod appears to be original to this gun from the period, although the first 1/3 portion of the rod has broken away. The lock mechanically functions crisp and tight. The jaw screw threads are stripped so the top jaw is loose, but both pieces are original. This is a fine English blunderbuss that was at sea when Blackbeard was a legitimate threat! Guns like this just do not turn up anymore. A fantastic addition to any firearms collection.
Scarce & Unusual B. C. Wood Percussion Over Under Double Rifle with B. Losey Markings, Inscribed, .36 cal, mfg. 1860's. This is a very intriguing rifle that appears to have been converted from a three-barrel drilling. Heavy octagon barrels measure 31 1/4" long featuring a small German Silver blade front sight with adjustable rear (elevator missing). The top barrel flat is marked "B. C. WOOD" (2x) and
"P. POST NY". Barry Wood was a rifle maker in Painted Post, New York, who specialized in multi barrel combination guns. A unique characteristic of his rifles is the triggerguard, which doubles as the main spring for the underhammer mechanism as seen on this gun. Additionally the barrels are twice marked "B. LOSEY". Losey was a gunsmith and barrel maker from Caroline, New York. It is likely that he performed the conversion work on this gun. Locks are nicely engraved and unmarked, the left lock having been abandoned of use. The barrels have a mottled gray/brown finish while the locks and furniture show a plum patina. The stock is very nice overall with no cracks or repairs and a wonderful untouched original look. There is one tiny chip above the left lock, otherwise the wood is excellent and features a cheekpiece along with a finely engraved Nickel Silver patchbox on which is inscribed "J. Jones". Iron buttplate & "main spring" triggerguard, with six original ramrod pipes and provisions for two rods. One ramrod is missing, the other a replacement. The right hammer pulls back strong but does not hold cock, while the underhammer functions perfect. Both nipples are clean originals. This is a wonderful looking rifle from a scarce western New York maker that could certainly benefit from further research. 
VERY RARE F. Wassmann, Washington D.C. 9 Gauge Percussion Double Barrel Sporting Shotgun with Patchbox & Sling Swivels, 9 Ga, mfg. ca. 1860. This is a fine and very rare American made shotgun. Wassmann was a German immigrant who set up shop in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington D.C. He was noted for fine craftsmanship and produced a very limited number of high quality shotguns and rifles. This is only the third Wassmann gun we have ever heard of in our years of collecting and the other two were both rifles. Typical of most American made shotguns of the day, the barrels were imported from England and are so proofed. The Damascus Laminated Steel barrels measure 31 1/4" long and feature a brass bead front sight with "LAMINATED STEEL' engraved on the top rib. They are marked as "10" bore, or 9 Gauge by American standard, and have bores which measure approximately .810". The barrels retain 20% original Damascus finish which has faded to a plum/gray patina. There are a couple very subtle dings on the right barrel about 3" back from the muzzle which are slight and hardly worth noting. The locks, hammers, barrel tang, and furniture are finely engraved. The right lock is engraved "F. WASSMANN" while the left is marked "WASHINGTON D.C.". The case colored locks and barrel tang have faded to silver with very faint hints of case color visible. The stock is very nicely figured and features a checkered wrist and forestock. The buttstock is very robust with a sizeable drop and slender wrist. It has a great feel when shouldered and the LOP measures 12 3/8" to rear trigger, 13 3/8" to front trigger. The wood has a very dark and untouched original piano finish. There is an old 1/2" chip just forward of the right lock with a fine 1/2" grain check behind. There are no additional cracks, chips, or repairs. The large Nickel plated brass patchbox is very unusual, measuring 5 1/8" long by 2 3/4" tall, and is notched into the buttplate. Large engraved steel buttplate and triggerguard. A solid Silver nameplate escutcheon is inlaid atop the wrist. Engraved steel wedge escutcheons and forend tip with original ramrod pipes. The brass tipped wood ramrod is original and features a worm at the opposite end. Sling swivels are original. Both actions are crisp and function perfect, and both nipples are clean originals. There is a crack beginning under the tip of the right hammer, and the right hammer screw is a period replacement. This is an impressive and unusual quality American shotgun by a very rare maker.
PRICE: SOLD
SOLD
PRICE: $675
Wonderful & Unusual European Flintlock Double Barrel Shotgun with Octagon Barrels, Converted to Percussion, 20 Ga, mfg. ca. 1815. This gun has a fantastic untouched look with tons of character! The octagon barrels (very unusual for a shotgun) measure 26 3/4" long and are their original length. This gun was probably intended to be either a close brush gun or a coach guard gun, likely the latter. There
are no markings on the gun whatsoever, though I would venture to say it is possibly French. The barrels are fitted with a brass bead front sight with a wide sighting guide on the barrel tang. Overall the metal has a rich, dark plum patina. The stock features a checkered wrist and cheekpiece. The wood shows a beautifully untouched original look with heavy patina in protected areas. Two thin brass plates and one large fitted plate were added during the period to repair a crack through the wrist. Generally we don't like to see damaged or repaired wrists but in cases such as this the repair is so well done and done so long ago that it only enhances the look of the gun. An old chip is missing from the toe of the buttstock, yet again it occurred so long ago that the tip of the buttplate has curled over the missing piece of wood and continued to wear with time. A very old foreign coin of some kind is inlaid atop the wrist, partially covered by the wrist plate. The gun appears to have had a sling swivel mounted under the buttstock and at the first ramrod pipe, both of which were omitted during the period. Original iron buttplate, triggerguard, ramrod pipes, and brass tipped wood ramrod. The forend cap inlay is missing. Both actions are crisp and function great, and both nipples are clean originals. This is just a really neat old shotgun that truly tells a story! Not to mention the configuration and small gauge are quite scarce.
J. E. HARDER MAKER
CLEARFIELD PA
PRICE: $2,500
PRICE: $2,500
Rare & Fantastic William Lamb & Sons North Carolina Percussion Full Stock Jamestown Rifle with Golcher Lock, Tiger Maple Stock, Double Set Triggers, Inscribed, with Inlaid Hotel/Brothel Token, .34 cal, mfg. ca. 1860. This is a truly wonderful looking rifle from the greatest of the Jamestown school of rifle makers. Octagon barrel measures 42 1/4" long with a long and low dovetailed brass blade front sight. The rear sight is a finely made small buckhorn sight which is mounted forward of an additional filled dovetail. The top barrel flat is stamped "W. LAMB & SONS" and inscribed with presumably the owner's name "J. Green". The lightly engraved trade lock is made by the famed Golcher family of lock makers and is marked "GOLCHER". Overall the metal has a pleasing dark plum patina. The Tiger Maple stock shows tons of character with an outstandingly untouched, worn patina. Running your hands along the stock you can even feel how the wood has worn between the grain. There is a fine old 2" crack forward of the forestock band on the right side with an equally old staple repaired 2 1/2" crack behind the forend cap. There is also a sliver of wood added along the toe of the buttstock during the period. There are no additional cracks, chips, or repairs and the wood is in very good condition for a full stock rifle of this age. The left side of the buttstock features a subtle cheekpiece with an inlaid brass pick holder, while the opposite side features a wonderful engraved brass "fish" style patchbox. Original brass buttplate and toeplate have a very dark, mellow patina. A brass token is inlaid below the lock screw which reads "ROOM". It may have said more at one time but is now heavily worn. Likely this was either a hotel or brothel token (I can only begin to imagine where this rifle has been!). Iron triggerguard and forearm band with brass ramrod pipes. The wood ramrod is original from the period. Typical North Carolina style dovetail pattern Pewter forend cap. The action and double set triggers function perfect and the nipple is a clean original. The bore is very clean with sharp rifling and no rust or pitting. Only some slight wear toward the muzzle. This is an outstanding example of a frontier used Jamestown long rifle.